Monday, December 29, 2014

Creating a Secure Password

Passwords provide the first line of defense against unauthorized access. The stronger your password, the more protected you will be from hackers and malicious software. You should make sure you have strong pass for everything you do.
What makes a password strong?

A strong password:
    Is at least eight characters long.
    Does not contain your user name, real name, or company name.
    Does not contain a complete word.
    Is significantly different from previous passwords.
    Contains characters from each of the following four categories:
  
  Character category
   
    Examples
    Uppercase letters
   
    A, B, C
    Lowercase letters
   
    a, b, c
    Numbers
   
    0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
    Symbols found on the keyboard (all keyboard characters not defined as letters or numerals) and spaces
   
    ` ~ ! @ # $ % ^ & * ( ) _ - + = { } [ ] \ | : ; " ' < > , . ? /
A password might meet all the criteria above and still be a weak password. For example, Hello2U! meets all the criteria for a strong password listed above, but is still weak because it contains a complete word. H3ll0 2 U! is a stronger alternative because it replaces some of the letters in the complete word with numbers and also includes spaces.
Help yourself remember your strong password by following these tips:
    Create an acronym from an easy-to-remember piece of information. For example, pick a phrase that is meaningful to you, such as My son's birthday is 12 December, 2004. Using that phrase as your guide, you might use Msbi12/Dec,4 for your password.
    Substitute numbers, symbols, and misspellings for letters or words in an easy-to-remember phrase. For example, My son's birthday is 12 December, 2004 could become Mi$un's Brthd8iz 12124 (it's OK to use spaces in your password).
    Relate your password to a favorite hobby or sport. For example, I love to play badminton could become ILuv2PlayB@dm1nt()n.
If you feel you must write down your password in order to remember it, make sure you don't label it as your password, and keep it in a safe place.
Never directly write down the password, you can write down tip to help you remember.
Further Notes
1. Never give your password to anyone
2. Clear browser history when you use a public computer
3. Never use 'save password', 'remember me' or 'keep me logged in' options when working with a public computer
4. Change password regularly- once in a year should be the least
5. Never use you credit card details on a public network or computer
Thank you for reading. Don't forget to share.